Cross-continental collaboration through the Scientist Exchange Program

Far from his home in Potsdam, Germany, Christian Mohr attended the third Coastal Rainforest Margins Research Network (CRMRN) workshop in Juneau, Alaska last March. Along the way, he had the opportunity to finally meet with distant collaborators working in his field and make connections from his research in the temperate rainforests of Patagonia to theContinue reading Cross-continental collaboration through the Scientist Exchange Program

Can yellow-cedar recover from climate-driven declines?

Across the temperate rainforest of Southeast Alaska, a change is taking root. Warming winters are reducing snowpack in the region and causing a massive decline in a culturally, economically, and ecologically important tree species; yellow-cedar. Yellow-cedar trees are adapted with fine, shallow roots that allow them to respond to early spring warming and get aContinue reading Can yellow-cedar recover from climate-driven declines?

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North to South: Freeze and fire trends in American coastal temperate rainforests

In a warming world, the Arctic is often cited as the leading edge of climate change. But the coastal temperate rainforests of North and South America may qualify as another frontier: while the Arctic is warming at a faster rate, these temperate rainforests are crossing key temperature thresholds that may trigger sudden shifts in ecosystemContinue reading North to South: Freeze and fire trends in American coastal temperate rainforests

Do ecosystem disturbances enhance forest carbon storage in Southeast Alaska?

Change spurs growth, even for forests. Disturbances such as landslides, wind, and wildfires are part of the ecosystem dynamics of a region. Over a short timescale, disturbances are known to decrease carbon stored as forest biomass, by burning and uprooting vegetation and disrupting growth. But across broad time and spatial scales, exposure to disturbances mayContinue reading Do ecosystem disturbances enhance forest carbon storage in Southeast Alaska?