Hakai Coastal Initiative Postdoctoral Fellow Position

Linking the land and sea on the British Columbia coast: How dynamic nutrient fluxes from small rainforest watersheds shape cross-system connections. Applications are invited for a two-year postdoctoral fellowship with the Hakai Coastal Initiative at the University of British Columbia. Coastal temperate rainforests of the world are linked to coastal oceans through the riverine fluxContinue reading Hakai Coastal Initiative Postdoctoral Fellow Position

Talk: Ecosystem Carbon Stocks and Lateral Carbon Fluxes in a Coastal Temperate Rainforest

ACRC postdoc Gavin McNicol will present an overview of recent work by the Coastal Rainforest Margins Research Network at the International Arctic Research Center in Fairbanks today, Thursday, July 19th 2018. Join us to hear about modeling carbon stocks and fluxes in the PCTR with machine learning approaches, and the environmental controls on soil carbon stocks in the temperateContinue reading Talk: Ecosystem Carbon Stocks and Lateral Carbon Fluxes in a Coastal Temperate Rainforest

Scientist Exchange Program now accepting applications

The Coastal Rainforest Margins Research Network (CRMRN) is currently accepting applications for the Scientist Exchange Program (SEP). The goals of this exchange program are to facilitate new collaborations between scientists; build new skills in field, laboratory, or statistical techniques; and assist with production of a deliverable product of the collaboration (e.g., manuscripts, data sets, research proposals). SEP Application FormContinue reading Scientist Exchange Program now accepting applications

Ad hoc instrumentation methods in ecological studies produce highly biased temperature measurements

In any region-spanning collaborative effort, using (as-much-as-possible) unbiased methods is of course desirable. Check out the recent paper by Terando et al. It’s open access, available here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ece3.3499/epdf They experimentally compared 11 different sensor brand and shield combinations to weather station data, and found that quite a few methods had a positive bias. It’s notContinue reading Ad hoc instrumentation methods in ecological studies produce highly biased temperature measurements

Workshop 2: Marine-terrestrial Interactions in the Coastal Temperate Rainforest Domain

Applications are now closed. During this second workshop we will bring together a select group of oceanographers, biogeochemists, biologists, modellers and others interested in processes occurring at the land-sea interface in temperate regions. Although the workshop will focus heavily on the Pacific Coast, our findings are expected to have applications to temperate coastal rainforest domainsContinue reading Workshop 2: Marine-terrestrial Interactions in the Coastal Temperate Rainforest Domain

Longest running successional plot network in the world: All photos

The longest running ecological plot network in the world looking at succession (1916-present) is in Glacier Bay, and now all available photographs have been compiled.  They show a plant community evolving, from mostly bare rock to a variety of current states – spruce, alder, and willow, very different endpoints and something apparently unique to this portionContinue reading Longest running successional plot network in the world: All photos

New map of yellow-cedar decline published

A new map of both the range and decline of yellow-cedar has been published in Global Change Biology with help from researchers in Alaska, BC, and Washington.  The high resolution range map stretches from northern California to southcentral Alaska, from sea level in the north to treeline in the south.  The decline, now quantified atContinue reading New map of yellow-cedar decline published